All Articles
Lifelog

Mayonnaise & Wine

There are precisely four types of wine —

  1. You take a sip and you go "Ewww...get this nonsense away from me"
  2. You take a sip and you go "Not bad"
  3. You take a sip and you go "Yumm! What's on the label and where can I buy it?"
  4. You take a sip and you go "Eww...urm, slurp, that's actually quite nice."

Other methods of categorizing wine based on the type of grapes, fermentation/mixing process, fizz, etc. are purely academic.

"Good wine" is also a highly contentious case. A wine you love could be hated by someone else, and that's totally fine. People have different tastes. My point is that it's one of the few drinks that is complex as well as personal. You either drink vodka or you don't, but with wine, even if you're into it, you could find an odd case surprisingly good and most others horribly mediocre.

I've spent ~31 years so far devouring products containing mayonnaise. Mayonnaise is awesome. So in the last few months, I've been trying to hunt down the perfect mayonnaise in local stores. This is after being thoroughly impressed by the Japanese Mayo brand Kewpie that I received thanks to my brother and sis-in-law. Kewpie increased my curiosity to a new level. I had tried Indian brands and they had completely turned me off to the idea of buying mayo to make sandwiches at home.

I started with the highly recommended Hellmann's. Honestly, it doesn't compare to Kewpie. Kewpie's texture is creamier and the taste is complex with a bit of an after-taste that lingers. Hellmann's in comparison is flat, bland, but still better than everything else I've tried around here.

Next, based on online reviews, I gave Remia a shot. Not worth it. There's a strong essence of preservatives that's hard to ignore. I'm glad I bought the local Veeba Burger Mayo just so I can use the combo to get through the Remia jar. Veeba is actually pretty decent although it's too sour/vinegary to use by itself.

But this mayo/salad dressing hunt is pretty exciting. I'm going to keep trying different combos to see what fits. Like wine, mayo is incredibly complex to judge and it's ability to enhance taste (depending on what you're having with it) is pretty amazing.